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for this era to the well-educated, highly professional other hand i found myself drinking of two or three glasses of wine before, five, six. i caught myself quickly and went to rehab. >> what was that like for you? that realization. it's probably the worst thing i've ever gone through in the sense that i was full of shame, deeply humiliated by my behavior i didn't do any of the above but i did blackout each night before i went to sleep, and it was something i said get a handle on it. i have learned so much to alcohol in my childhood. i knew that i was addicted. and i found myself going for help but it was compounding. what is confounding is. >> host: like as a kid mirror mere month on the wall i am my mother after all. do you think that what you have experienced is pretty common with other women? >> guest: the extreme behavior that i was involved in was in the spectrum and i became addicted. i think the larger group of women are not addictive it's only about two and a half percent depending on the country how many are actually alcoholic could but there are involved in risky behavior that
will be able to come. ine education system afghanistan, not just higher education. universities, the number that was given to me is so i don'ttuitive use it. in terms of the lower grades before you get to colleges and universities, before the taliban was driven out to the been, 900,000ave boys in afghan schools ten or so.ago now 8 million students in schools. about 3 million of those are girls. none of whom could have been educated before we got there allies.r in 2001, under the taliban were 20,000 teachers, all male. now 200,000 teachers. 60,000 of whom are women. healthcare many improved. significantlyty down. refugeeslion afghan who fled to pakistan have returned home. that 67% of the a mostan people in recent survey think that the afghan war was not worth fighting? how did that happen? the picture is much, number.tter than that i just don't believe that the american people have had a fair or fuller picture of the events in afghanistan. that the press has story. a good it hasn't missed the problems. it has missed the progress. our peoplesion that either.sn't come from it comes from what
rationale in many quarters, particularly higher education. the diversity rationale says we want to engage in special efforts to bring in people from all walks of life, all sectors, all regions, all ideological dispositions, all races. the reason why we want this is we believe that on our campuses there will be richer learning. there will be more learning, better learning, deeper learning takes place through the clash of perspective. and, you know, students will learn from one another. so the diversity rationale for affirmative action. that's some of the why affirmative action rose in the late '60s, early '70s but in these are some of the reasons that have been set for for affirmative action. okay. why is a controversial? affirmative action like all policies has cost. it has costs. what are some of those costs? there's a bunch just like there's a wide range of justifications, rationale, for affirmative action. there's also an array of costs. i'll mention a couple. let me start off with one, stigma. it's an important one because there some people, i think he neatly of the most vociferous cr
system, our education system, our access to energy, could make this a platform that every country around the world wants to be in. and growth here at home. >> we will close down. thank you so much for all of thoughts. well done. [ applause ] >> tonight, on c-span. armed services committee chairman senator carl levin inlks about the situation afghanistan. followed by remarks from obama and prime minister of iraq nouri themaliki and remarks at antidefamanion league. week, michigan senator carl levin traveled to and met with president karzai. today, the senate armed services committee chairman about improvements in the country as the u.s. and prepare to remove troops from afghanistan in 2014. from the council on foreign relations. is an hour. >> welcome to the foreign relations. i'm johnathan karl. a high honor to be here with levin. introduction.s no interduck carl levin is the chairman of the senate armed services from the great state of michigan and of special interest to me, just back from a trip to afghanistan where he commanders over there and also had a one on one president karzai. i
innovation and education because of the nature of our communities and the structure and the openness with which they operate. that people will have access here because we will continue to work hard to make sure that we have the most qualified workers one of the largest consumer market in the world. this, i do not say any of with one bit of arrogance. good newsecause that for america is also good news for the world. it is good news for you and your businesses. nina the importance of the american economy in terms of driving china's economy and other economies in the world. their importance is driving other economies in the region and elsewhere. it is a principle reason why we should invest in here. it is a top priority at a level i might any before. -- unlike any before. you're sitting here in the hot -- heart of the most open economy in the world. the u.s. is the largest recipient of direct investment. manufacturing was mentioned. we have about 5.6 million total good paying american jobs contribute in close to when chilean dollars to our economy that comes from foreign direct investme
voluntarily give everything? how to educate and to whom i am not sure people are so aware how much misinformation with a single individual they could but most of the information is inaccurate. even with the database segregators even roberta who live todd a street 50 years ago is in l.a. you come up with the aggregate to show conviction said failure to appear for the traffic violation. i don't think people realize the information that they have to try to clear there name. >> the first question is important it is not just brazil but china and every rare but the recognition that our multinational corporations are protected by the nation state and they may be a multinational and other ways but there is a parochial concern and a recognition of other areas of control a end to independence to those places to be very important and if these companies want to retain their position they will have to shape up to take on the own government. we are aid normal nation of. we don't have to control everything it takes more room to become more sensible the concerns wages, it's jobs, and we may find t
for some people and for some black people who had developed the skills and gone in education, so when these artificial race barriers were taken from them, they were in a position to march right forward. but that did not help so much the many millions of black people who had really been debilitated by the jim crow segregation and what about the black people because of this, that they did not get a good education or were deprived of opportunities. even when the racist barriers went down, let's hypothesize that for a moment. but because they hant. but because they have been deprived of opportunity in the past, they are nonetheless at a tremendous disadvantage in competitions to move forward in american life and people said that that is not fair. that in a sense if we do not provide a helping hand to those people, we are permitting and we are simply -- we are committing debilitating effects of racist treatment in the past to live on and we are allowing a continuation and a perpetuation of past racial mistreatment that is unjust. and that is the effort and desire to overcome the effects, t
at the board of education meeting. she hopes to attend vanderbilt university to study medicine and one day join doctors without borders. i wish her luck in her future endeavors and i know she will make our fourth district proud. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from michigan seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i seek unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman from michigan is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, mr. speaker. this week unfortunately food stamps will be cut by $5 billion. we expected that. mr. kildee: what's worse is even more deeper cuts could follow. conferees start negotiating a farm bill this week, and billions of dollars -- in fact, $40 billion have been -- in cuts have been proposed by republicans in the house. 10 times the amount of cuts passed in the bipartisan bill in the senate. i've talked to dozens of people in my district who since i've been here in congress have come up to me and said, you know, thank you for fighting to preser
our country who are trying to save for their retirements, save for their children's college education, saving for their first home, are not harmed by confusing, costly regulations coming out of washington. mr. speaker, all americans know that a flood -- a flood -- of shington red tape has hurt our economy. that's why tens of millions of our fellow countrymen remain unemployeed or underemployed. unfortunately, more regulations are on the way. specifically today, mr. speaker, we are speaking about the securities and exchange commission and the department of labor who are headed toward proposing two massive and inconsistent rule makings. they're going to hurt the ability of retail investors to get financial advice that they need for their portion of the american dream. mr. speaker, retail investors are not big-time professionals on wall street. retail investors had no role in causing the financial crisis. and they should not be punished for it which reglet -- which regrettably this rule making could do. rather retailers are hardworking citizens from our congressional districts who buy an
in getting it into the education system and am wondering if you could talk about that along with the press that we need to get people interested because it's all about selling new ideas. we don't talk about complexity. we live in a complex system. finally, last night i saw a play called "love in afghanistan." i think it's one of the most powerful plays of ever seen and i'm a performing arts junkie. i recommend everyone to go see it. it was fabulous. it addresses the things were talking about. >> it's a really important point. somebody brought over some young afghan music students about six months ago. it was terrific. we brought them to the capital so that some of my colleagues could see. i think there were like eight students on afghan instruments at a music school which could have never existed and they are there preserving their heritage. it has an impact when people can see a play or whatever, of course it does. telling stories are important. the problem on the other side is i'm not a good storyteller, by the way. i admire those of my colleagues who are. it's the most powerful way to g
hill. on tuesday, maryland -- marilyn thenner will come before senate health, education, labor, and pensions committee. her agency is responsible for overseeing the healthcare.gov website. that hearing will be live at 10:00 a.m. eastern live on c- span. a day later, hhs secretary kathleen sebelius will testify before this -- the senate finance committee. we will have that live wednesday at 10 a.m. eastern, also here on c-span. >> what's the most important issue congress should consider in 2014? that's the question for middle and high school students in c- span's "student can" video competition. make it 5-7 minute documentary that shows a variant points of view and includes c-span video for your chance to win the grand prize of $5,000. this year, we have double the number of winners in total prizes. entries must be in by january 20, 2014. need more information? go to studentcam.org. "newsmakers"next, with agriculture sector a tom bill sat. he talks about the farm bill and its ties to the u.s. economy. after a hearing -- after that, a hearing on stand your ground laws. at 8:00 p.
, but more proud of title 9, 1973, this country came to make sure of equality for women in education and that includes sports. and the result is women in athletics that are amazing and entertaining. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. mr. ellison: i congratulate them. thank you. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from michigan seek wreck his? -- seek recognition? the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today to say thank you to a friend of mine, mayor james r. bobbing, who has dedicated 45 years of service to the city of granville in the second district. in the last 29 he he served as mayor. mayor bobbing has been recognized countless times for his leadership and commitment to west michigan. most recently he received the michigan municipal league michael a. guideo leadership and public leadership service award. in addition he serves as the chairman of the grandville council which plays a leading role in fostering public and private cooperation to enhance quality of
-sex couples. also, how they respond when gays seek a religious education or communion for children. soughtormation was also on pastoral care of men and women who live together outside of marriage. the national catholic reporter broke the story on thursday and posted a copy online. michael is in miamisburg, ohio. republican line, what is the top story for you? -- i hit the wrong button. independent line. caller: hello. thank you very much. receiverld you put the up? it is hard to hear you? caller: sure. host: thank you. caller: can you hear me now? is abouttory for me health insurance and getting sick erie it i think a lot of debate is making people sick. they're worried about their health now. this will make them anxious and more prone to disease. the only solution is to try not to get sick. that is all an individual can do. avoid accidents in dangerous situations. -- a lote i am smoking of people know what to do. i would stay away from doctors if i could. when i go to the doctor, he has all of this fancy equipment. 30 years ago, they did not have all that stuff. we are able to be
'm going to be able to become to doing so. in education system afghanistan, not just higher education, but so many universities that the number of them even to me as counterintuitive so i don't use them. before you get to colleges and universities and before the taliban and was driven out, and they said they have been, 9000 now onethe schools am million. about 3 million of them are girls but none of them could have been educated before we got there with our allies. 2001, there were 20,000 teachers, all-male. there are now 200,000 teachers, 60,000 of them are women. improved., much child mortality, significantly down. 5 million afghan refugees fled to pakistan and have returned .ome is it that 67% of the american people in the most recent survey think the afghan war was not worth fighting? how does that happen? the picture is much, much better number.t i just don't believe that the american people have had a fair or more full picture of the events in afghanistan. i believe the press has missed a good story. it has not missed of the problems but it has missed the progress. the impressio
of you know and many of you probably were educated in the united states. i cannot tell you how many heads of state and finance ministers throughout government, heads of state and chief executives who i need as i travel the world as a senator to go to school who participated in educational exchanges and the fulbright program, meet them everywhere. foreign ministers in saudi arabia who has been foreign minister for 30 years or more. he proudly reminds me of his education at princeton. and another showed me a photograph and said this was you and me 25, 35 years ago when i met you at a law of diplomacy school when you were a senator. many immigrants know that the american dream is not restricted to those born in america. if you go to miami, chicago, san francisco, any major city in america, you will find a community that speaks your language and understand your culture and welcomes diversity and can serve as an anchor for your next venture. it is not just the big cities. you heard it from secretary pritzker and president obama. success stories. indian manufacturers expanding plants in upstate
-- not laid out specifics he said he wants to fund education with federal money through possibly expanding medicare. both candidates agrow however they want to create jobs and grow the economy. >> my tax cut plan which will grow 58,000 new jobs and reduce the personal income tax the 5%. and the business income tax to 4%. >> my opponent proposes $1.4 billion tax cut and resoundly criticized. it will come right out of education. early childhood development, reform in the sols. teacher pay. investing in community colleges. financial aid at higher ed. i think that's the prudent way to do budgeting. >> i like those too. i like education. i like puppies. but i don't bring a puppy home. i don't bring a puppy home if i don't have a plan for how i'm going to deal with that puppy. or guess what my house is going to look like. and he's all puppy and no plan. >> reporter: so how are voters feeling four days out? we talked to some of them coming up in the next half hour. andrea and mike back to you. >>> thank you. >> the woman accused of vandalizing the washington national cathedral and possibly the li
, the unbelievable cause from a civic education perspective, benefits, are there. they are tremendous. they are undeniable. but with these nine they might come to a different conclusion. semi-final thing to say is the good news here is i do think this is generational, and i think it is inevitable fedecamaras will be in the supreme court. that is my generation, we're used to having cameras all the time. the default is we're being recorded. we are using phones that have cameras and cameras everywhere taking pictures of us, and with the rise of google glass, we will always be on camera. so the supreme court will look extremely idiosyncratic to be the one place in which it's a camera freeze him. so i shut the chief justice's view that the court should give up with the times. i think that's and bravely going to happen and it's a question of the person i was on the court and who is comfortable and who is not. >> having watched you argue on the supreme court i don't think you have to worry about her foibles being broadcast on television. i can't remember any. this is one place where the cour
and back and forth. i appreciate it. i thank you for it. i would have had a great education, though, if you had kept me until the end, and i want to thank you and the ranking member for your leadership. we have appreciated it and admired it in our chamber, and also chairwoman stabenow for your effort and sustained effort in getting us to this point. i feel privileged as others have said to be part of the farm bill conference committee and join those who said this is the way we should should be doing our wn congress. this is the way we are going to be able to regain the confidence of the american people, not with the rock throwing and brick throughing and the screaming, but working together in a bipartisan, bicameral way, and that is the expectation of our farmers and ranchers. the farmers and ranchers in rural communities driving colorado's $40 billion agricultural economy, it is critical that we work through our differences to complete this process. mr. chairman, if i could sum up what i heard in the nearly 0 # listens sessions we've had all across colorado on this topic, the message is v
exciting thing may an entire industry of lower-cost educational devices that every student has. now suddenly, you have education content among not from textbooks, etc. we obviously are very focused for jobs reasons and infrastructure reasons to improve our airports, roads, bridges. we need all that, and that is partly an idea of fiscal of our tax laws. we're working on that. keep our eye on the 21st century because that type -- one of the first mover jumps that the united states got at the end of the 1990's is our small businesses and entrepreneurs were using the internet first and foremost. that generated a lot of inventory improvement, and growth and productivity spur we productivity's bird we had -- productivity spurt we had. one of things i want to say, we are doing selectusa here, but we learn from other countries. we look at what south korea is doing on universal broadband for schools. we listened, when the president did his in sourcing for them, he listened to other countries why they chose another country on things that we could have done better, and it has affected what we
people are promoted every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. as your life changes, fidelity is there for your personal economy, helping you readjust along the way, refocus as careers change and kids head off to college, and revisit your investments as retirement gets closer. wherever you are today, fidelity's guidance can help you fine-tune your personal economy. start today with a free one-on-one review of your retirement plan. . >>> time now -- >> you see kenney? >> yeah. couldn't figure out who that was. >> you showed the picture. that's kenney. >> he had a hat on. that's amazing. >> most important than that you see whose above kenney. look at pretty boy. was he sitting town there? >> yes. that's blasphemous. you see barnacle here. very interesting. most people sitting next to the secretary of state would actually talk to the secretary of state. no. no. >> he did not speak.
, and the council on foreign relations working on a range of economics and education issues. he is the co-author of a book on girls education and an author of the pro-growth progressive and economic strategy for shared prosperity. gene graduated from the university of minnesota and yale law school and attended wharton business school. is a native of ann arbor, michigan, and will be joining his them in california at the end of this year. when he finishes his remarks will move over here for two and a. thank you very much. gene? >> well, thank you very much for having us here today. i want to thank jim doyle very much, not just for today but for all the leadership of business forward, all the consultations, even the recent meeting with your small business advisory committee as we went into this recent round of budget discussions. so again, i really want to thank you and business forward for the leadership that you've shown, and the desire to look beyond your own particular situation to the larger economic issue that we face as a country, and understanding that that affects all of us. so agai
. we have mitigated disputes across iraq. we also put a foundation of civic education, human rights, and religious moderation for the institutions of education. ip and its partners are proud of the progress we have made. we also recognize a lot remains to be done in iraq, and we see from the unfortunate tragic violence that has still cost many lives the road ahead will not be easy. you excellency, we assure and the iraqi people that as iraq prepare for the 2014 elections and faces challenges to a secure better future for the people, iraq and kept on the support of the u.s. institute for peace for a partner on all levels, starting with the community, two local councils, to international dialogue. thank you. ask theld like to ambassador to come forward. the format today will be an introduction -- come here. it will be an introduction of the prime minister i the ambassador, and in the prime minister will speak. and then sit and take questions. the audience already knows this. if you have questions, perhaps you have already written them out, we will not have time for a great number of q
, but education programs to ensure they don't end up here in the first place. >> here to help us understand what we can do to protect ourselves is a doctor, an assistant professor of neurology. thank you for being here. >> my pleasure. >> why are so many young people suffering strokes >>. >> it's a great question. there's not been a lot of studies designed to answer that question. probably some need to be done. but it's most likely a combination of factors. the first is the surprising incidence of risk factors - such as smoking, people are getting diabetes, obesity, and then the other thing is we are getting better at detecting strokes. technology, mri scanning, and we can pick up more strokes than we used to. >> you mentioned detecting strokes. how can one tell. i understand there's a fast method. >> that is a fantastic question. because strokes can have variable symptoms, it's important that we get out the word on how to tell you are having a stroke. there's a push to educate the government about doing a fast screen. that's the numonic, it's fast. the f stands for face. you look for asymmetry
is brought to you by mcdonald's thanking baltimore educators with free premium roast coffee every tuesday. thank you from baltimore mcdonald's family. don, back to you. >> thank you. >>> penn state is paying millions to those abused by jerry sandusky. mike schuh is live with details. >> reporter: good morning, don. good morning, everyone. the number of known victims in the penn state jerry sandusky sex scandal jumped dramatically. in a nearly $60 million settlement it was disclosed that 26 additional young men were strong enough to -- enough to be included in the agreement. a local scholar says the settlement was the wisest role for the schools. the money is covered by the school's insurance. mike schuh reporting live. >>> a local man is facing charges for selling drugs on the black market web site known as the silk road. jacob george the fourth is charged with selling heroin and other drugs on the site which the feds brought down earlier this month. police make arrests following the fatal shooting of a hotel worker in oxon hill. surveillance video
public and private investment in education r&d and infrastructure. over the last three years we've made real strides in reducing our deficit. we saved more than $12.5 billion. that's been unbalanced. about 70% has been from spending cut. 30% from revenue. we need to do more but we have do it, i believe, in a balanced way. we've heard from senators about the need to modernize the tax code and move toward real tax reform. while the committee can't get it done. we can move in that direction in a substantial way. making a modest cut of only 5% of the trillion dollars a year we spend through the tax code would make huge dent in the deficit. lastly, we have to don't make some reduction in direct spending. although i know that's the area taken the hardest hit. i'll insist on doing in a way that put a circle of production around around the most vulnerable and honoring our promises to seniors, veterans, and about to retirement to protect them from cuts. chairman rhode island i know, chairman muir ray. i'm glad we have come together. we need focus not on the area of disagreement but priority we s
would probably go abroad were you can get free education, free medical benefits, and not worry about the racial issues. host: if it is free, who pays for it to? caller: not sure who pays for the listening to your program and listening to other countries , i would less stressed at least give them an opportunity. you mean denmark, right -- right?er: caller: denmark. host: monti has this point -- you can call in to join the conversation -- do you feel you have the opportunity to get ahead in america ayako from michigan, jessica is up next. good morning. -- in america? from michigan, jessica is up next. good morning. caller: it is hard to get ahead in america when asians are taking our jobs here and taking our jobs overseas. the media believes we need a bunch of schooling to get ahead. i think that is wrong. host: thank you for the call. looking at the comparison of the chart we showed you from 1952 -- james is next from grand forks, north to code up. you say you do not have the opportunity to get ahead in this country, why? i have to say no i have to say that is where i come from. , c-s
. if you are turning 65 the number is about $500,000. and, in fact what we are trying to do is educate people around the world and we created a website which you can get on determine, actually what you need per month once you are 65 or older. it will tell you how much you need today or you can put in how much you have today and it will tell you how long that will last month by month. and this is very important that we get this message out that people need to invest now because in this survey the one thing we found and this is where wisdom comes in is everyone of the retires said they wished they had saved more for the future. >> it is worth reminding because people are spending more time planning vacations and thinking about which smart phones and cars to buy than they are about their retirement. how often should you be thinking about your retirement and planning for that? >> this is very important that you get invested today. the earlier the better because the money will work for you. because so much is sitting in cash earning 0 that over a 20 year period
and the senate we have robust beginning farmer and rancher legislation that focuses on education and building the capacity for the future. it also does some smart things to have set asides in some of these programs to make sure a new person on the land can access those things. i would certainly encourage us to come together. we're very close on that. keep those programs in there. once again, that builds our capacity for the future. in looking at capacity for the future, the land is our truly great resource. our producers are some of the best stewards of the land. but just like in all other things, we need to give them the tools they need to preserve that land. we need to make sure that conservation title is fully funded and we look visionary on those working lands to make sure we're not making the choices for those producers. they have the right to make the choice that works best for them. but make it both economically smart and people have proven they will take advantage of that. i would like to compliment my colleague from south dakota, who has worked with us on sod saver legislation that i
a pro-growth budget that we invest in education and research and modern roads and bridges and transit systems. that's what we need for our country. i want to share with my colleagues what i've been doing in my own state of maryland. because i am very optimistic about america's ability to compete if we stop these self-inflicted crises. i've had this made in maryland tour i've been doing thrut the state of maryland where i visited many small businesses biz in in my state. i give credit to my colleague in the house, congressman hoyer whose saying make it in america has caught on. so i took my friend, congressman hoyer's suggestion and i went around maryland to meet with different companies in our state and i must tell you maryland businesses are the best in the world. the best in the world. i know i'm a little biased about maryland but they're the best on innovation and creativity. let me give you a few examples that may not be self-evident like the paul reed smith guitar factory. that guitar factory is located on the eastern shore of maryland. and in a very little community, a small com
money. my job is not just to entertain, but to educate you. call me at 1-800-743-cnbc. only a few times in my career have i seen old line companies, actual, ancient work horse stocks and resource companies put on major moves on very little information or catalyst. something we saw today in a session, the dow gained, the nasdaq climbed .31%. once in motion, these old line stocks, kind of like fabulous running backs, more touches when everyone else gets tired in the 4th quarter, they will not quit. let me tell you about ten remarkable stocks, all have been rerated. that's the term from wall street, as different, better stories in the last few months, not much fanfare. these are companies that have been transformed. i'll list them in alphabetical order, so as not to hurt anybody's feelings. back in june, best buy was trading at $26 bucks. that was a remarkable run in january. most people figure best buy had to collapse from exhaustion of such a move. i mean it's retail. it has been shot by multiple attacks by washington. we all know income growth has been stagnant. employment, while creepi
are investments in infrastructure, education, science, and technology. when you add in the interest of the public debt, two thirds of the budget is medicare, medicaid, and social security. is and where the money that is where we going to make progress in the future. host: we will go to carl in chicago, illinois on our line for democrats. caller: good morning. you are just saying something about a balance between spending and revenue. i think you have it wrong. this is where the problem is. in 2000, we had a balanced budget. republicans chose to take all of the surplus and have tax cuts. they say that we could have a war. they said it would not cost us a dime. it cost us $1 trillion. then we also had the recession. americans lost three percent of their net worth. we lost gdp. this probably comes to maybe about a couple trillion dollars. this is not about the entitlements. not that they cannot be reforms. our principal problem is because we did not raise the taxes to pay for these things. it is not because we were spending too much. you cannot buy a yacht and take six months off of work. those were
, education, research, science, technology and the well over, when you add in interest on the public debt, 2/3 of the federal budget is basically medicare, medicaid, social security, defense spending and interest on the public debt. that is where the money is, that is where we're going to make any progress inwe reducing spendingn the future we have to focus our attention. >> host: carl from chicago, illinois, on the line for democrats. you're on with mr. hoagland. >> caller: good morning, gentleman. mr. hoagland, you're saying a balance between spending and revenues. i think thatth you got it wrong. this is where the problem is in my eyes. in 2000 we had a balanced budget anhad surplus. republican chose to take all the surplus and borrow money to have tax cuts, okay? they said that we could have a war. in six weeks it wasn't going to cost as you dime. that wasn't true. it cost us a trillion or two dollars, maybe one or two trillion doll -- $2 trillion. we had the recession where americans lost 30% of their net worth and lost gdp because the recession started in 2007. gdp in 2007 and 8. which
. >> september, 2001. it was my education. this -- just because of what's happened tonight, but now i have something that i can do to make a difference and that's to bring back their public -- to the united states citizen and to me the challenge that that poses is exciting. i'll be back. i can't even think back -- i'll be there. >> i'll be back from where? >> he'll be back from defeat. this is a clip that was filmed on the eve -- well, the night of the 2008 election. he'd been fighting on behalf of john mccain on campus and really felt overwhelmed by the support for barack obama. >> his campus is? >> carnegie-mellon university. >> ironically, a conservative campus. but to ben, i think he felt really attacked. >> what is he studying? >> government, politics. 50 what does he think of the republican party today and where is he today? >> you have to ask him. he's completing a phd. at michigan at the university of michigan. >> are you in touch with all of these guy s? >> in touch with all of them. some more than others. you make documentaries that some people become friends and some people beco
, the labor education bill, the defense bill, move them all individually. there is not enough time when we talk about the calendar. there is not enough time to move all of the bills individually at this point. host: sarah from dover, pennsylvania. caller: good morning. i would like to change the subject a little bit if i can. i live on medicare. the medicare and food stamps -- $125 a week.g on if they take food stamps away --m me -- the [indiscernible] he needs to feeds us first before he feeds anyone else. have a place to live. our guys come home from the service. they are losing because they have no place to live. i would like to see that to happen, too. thank you. host: there is a story in politico. the headline talks about the farm bill that he gets no respect, referencing rodney dangerfield. why is this an important discussion happening? guest: the last time we had a inm bill, that law expired 2008. what is it 2013? it has been five years since we had a new farm bill passed. the fact they are going into conference to sit down in both chambers, that is huge. that is something. he is ch
that is specifically designed for either outreach and education, so health centers hired education and outreach people as part of their outreach for health personnel. i would say it's definitely related cause to get expanded health care. >> thank you, mr. chairman. >> thank you, mr. chairman, thank you madam secretary for being here. my understanding is that a lot of the companies insurers that have been offering plans in the individual market, the ones sending out these notices, are actually repositioning themselves in the health insurance exchange to offer alternative plans. is that -- >> yes. >> and in addition to those insurers who have been in the individual market, you have a lot of other companies and insurers providing plans in health insurance market? >> that is true. >> so the way i look at this. i went to buy oriole tickets when the season was underway. they closed the window. i didn't have to go home because they opened another window a few feet away. so essentially what's happening is people are coming up on the renewal period and getting up to the window, the individual market and being
supporter of education for girls. she was 15 years old. during this next event hosted by politics and prose bookstore this -- malala yousafzai was interviewed by her father by michele martin of npr. this is about an hour. a [applause]
partners have throughout atives the country to educate americans about cybersecurity. cyberspace today is linked into every aspect of our daily lives and efforts such as this are crucial to creating a safe, secure and resilient cyberenvironment. i hope my colleagues will join me in congratulating all who made cybersecurity awareness month a success. thank you and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from georgia seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. johnson: mr. speaker, i rise to recognize an everyday hero, a young constituent of mine who has set an example we would all do well to follow. mary patricia hecter, a 15-year-old from georgia refused to sit idly by while children across the nation died in playgrounds, while funerals outnumbered graduation ceremonies and where violence begot more violence. she had a campaign to combt youth gun violence, aptly named think twice. her campaign encourages youth to think
and went to senior groups i said this. i have a responsibility to educate you to the best of my ability, even though i voted against this bill. i want you to know about it so that you can make reasonable decisions about your drug purchases. i didn't say let me find a way to undermine this. let me go to senior groups and tell them don't believe this stuff, don't even participate in it, even though it will hurt you in the long run, because it is a step in the right direction to rein in the cost of prescription drugs. why haven't they done that? why, when we've had the law passed and upheld by the supreme court, and we have had our election for president of the united states, why haven't any republicans reached out to help their fellow citizens understand what the aca is all about? why haven't many republican governors done that? they are entrenched in an ideology and i believe health care is more important. host: republican say that they disagree with the law -- guest: i disagreed with a law. 10 years ago i voted no, i argued on the floor against it. people are paying premiums for prescri
on the table in education funding. and what happens? well, to those, i say this. to you i say this, who i deeply respect. on the floor of the committee and off the floor of the house, what are you going to do about the approximately 17 million children with pre- existing conditions who can no longer be denied health insurance coverage e to you want to go back? do you want to say, you are no longer covered any longer? are you going to tell the parents of those kids? which one of you will stand up and tell the parents of those children the game is over, sorry, that was just a phase? >> will the german yield? >> i will. -- youuld just tell you asked a question and i will answer it. it is a false choice to say it is obamacare or nothing. there are enormous for postals, including the one i am cosponsored of. >> let me take the time back. are you serious? what you just said? are you really serious? ,fter what we have gone through after what we have gone through in the last 3.5 years? say you can sit there and you had a legitimate alternative after these years? we have gone through 44 votes, 48
governors, they refuse to set up marketplaces and leaving millions on the table in education funding. what happens? well, for those -- here, the floor of the committee and off the floor of the house, what are you going to do about the approximately 17 million children with preexisting conditions who can no longer be denied health insurance coverage. we want to go back and want to say you are no longer covered any longer. are you going to tell the parents of those kids? which one is going to stand up and tell the parents of those children that the game is over, sorry, that was just -- >> will the gentleman yield? >> yes, i will. >> i will just tell you -- where are you? >> right here. you asked a question and i'm going to answer it. it's a false choice to say it's obama care or nothing. there are numerous proposals including one that i'm a co-sponsor of -- >> i take back the time, sir. >> let me take the time back. are you serious what you just said? are you really serious? after what we've gone through and what we've gone through in the last three and a half years? have you -- you can sit
, the only counsel against handgun violation, the education fund, the newtown action alliance, moms demand action, and many, many more. they'll be included in the record without objection. i also like to say that when solicitation was set out for those members publicly listed members of al throbbing tell me their status or position on this volunteering, if they wish, that information some ask their statement be part of the record. they will at the request. those who didn't make the request will not be included. again, i don't want to create any chilling effect on participation and american politics. it's important we preserve all of our constitutional rights do so. i thought it was appropriate to find put to the member of the organization stood by the policy position that was stated. the hearing record is going to be open for one week to accept addition statements. if there no further comments from the panel or the colleagues. i thank the witnesses for attending and my colleagues for participating. the hearing stands adjourned. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible
's an education you can't get anywhere else. there's strong, and then there's army strong. try it on at goarmy.com. >>> actorses kate bosworth and josh lucas take on an american literary icon in the new film "significa "big sur." >> the film dives into the life of alcoholism. and josh lucas and kate bosworth, his mistress. it seemed complicated. >> kate's real life husband michael polloispolish, and josh up with had its baby. your baby's here and we love him. >> my baby sheer, because my babysitter did not show up. i was racing to be here on time to make that. this movie created two relationships. kate with the director michael and they ended up getting married and my wife fell in love during this movie and there's our son. >> go watch the movie. you better. >> kate, you always wanted to work with your husband, but did you think you'd end up marrying him? >> you know, i've always admired his work, and i signed on to this film because i'm such a fan of his, such a fan that i didn't ever want to leave his side again. >> is it at all awkward when your boyfriend is the director? how does that work
do you realize folds of honor will pay $180,000 to take care of all three of my kids' education? that's what we are here tomorrow to do. we are running to honor all these incredible men like her husband that have made these ache faces for our country. very unapologetically celebrate our freedoms as a nation tomorrow. >> amen. are you raising money tomorrow? >> yes, so our goal, is to raise $26,200. we certainly need all the viewers out there. >> and i know our viewers will want to help. how exactly would they? >> so they can visit folds of honor.org. and go right to the marathon portal and make a donation and those dollars will go to help lisa's kids go to school. >> lisa, i have got to ask you, what has this relationship meant to you, folds of honor. >> it's been incredible to me. as a parent i'm constantly saying to my kids look them in the eyes and say thank you. every time i pick up my kids from school and they're smiling and their lips are bubbling with the knowledge they learned, i hear and see my country saying thank you. thank you to my kids, my family. and that is paramount.
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